ACCOUNTABILITY AND MOTIVATION

Here we go on accountability.

According to my dictionary, the definition of accountability is the ability to count on something or someone, sustainability in doing tasks or in supplying demands. Well, I actually had a professor at the graduation program, who said I used to quote myself.

I guess he was correct, I still do it.

According to Collins dictionary, accountability is a synonym for responsibility, apparently an easy concept to associate. I propose that out of the needs and obligations realm- this is possibly why they are called obligations- appointments to fulfill and hours to be filled with people and tasks that have a set schedule, you observe your own accountability.

How easy is to be accountable? Again, just counting on your own agenda maybe counting on a secretary, who is barely aware of your real activities and interests, how easy to do is this? Bear a little with me in between I insist on the accountability issue.

As you probably got by now, my point is: how can someone stretch alone and still try to be accountable. It seems to me that the most important person to be accountable for is yourself and everything comes after this. Correct me if I’m wrong; is everyone together on this one?

Let’s have some other views on the issue.

At the same time that accountability stands for responsibility it also calls for the ability to support people and situations. On the other hand, accountability also depends on considering the motivation aspect for the person to follow through. I have a little story on this. Everyone dreams sometimes and it is important to listen to the dreams that stand out.

This dream came after a long and cold winter in Canada, when the bright lights of spring were starting to shine over days that one could smell back the perfume of flowers. In the dream, I heard my mother’s voice letting me know that I needed to practice. Even though I was jogging and practicing yoga regularly, my instructor and I found ourselves wondering what I should be practicing.

Next morning, the picture changed a bit. The dialogue that I reminded early morning was between my dad and me. He was saying in an imposing voice that if I weren’t motivated, that something should motivate me, he requested.  From this viewpoint, motivation was underlining accountability. The idea became clear by then.

As much as accountability is an easy thing to do for some, it takes a very special effort to others. Motivation, or the lack of it, has been a common complaint in my private practice. How one keeps motivated in life seems to be a challenge even to the most successful people.  Many times, motivation cannot keep up with a “give and take” kind of relationship. Most of the time, motivation counts on the spare of the moment and spontaneity that happen out of some implicit satisfaction, wherever you look for it.

This reminds me of some moments of Oprah’s last episode. She didn’t forget to thank everyone who participated in her 25 years-project of accountability on TV. It seems easy to infer that motivation was not only an important factor to the success of her endeavor but also that underlined the accountability of the entertainer. One good example consists in how many times Oprah was spotted without a big smile on her face during her programs. It is all part of the deal. Another example, on a previous interview, she revealed that when she was little, her grandmother was the responsible for the learning of a woman’s household tasks. One of them, washing clothes, was especially important to granny. At this time, O points out her decision of never doing it again. And she kept her words.

Right here and ‘in the now’, with a clear purpose of motivating people, I plan to open up a new room on ‘Facebook’. I hope to see you in the new space. I surely will keep you posted. And for now, I thank all for the support and accountability, including Oprah’s example.

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